top of page

kwaheri

In the quaint village of Kwaheri, nestled amidst rolling hills and lush greenery, lived Wanjiku—a woman unlike any other. She woke up each morning to the cacophony of farmyard sounds: cows lowing, chickens clucking, and her four husbands performing their various morning abulations.


(Tool: Pixlr.com | Prompt: a wife with many husbands)


As she stretched and yawned, Wanjiku couldn't help but chuckle at the sight before her. There was Mzee Kamau, the eldest of her husbands, tending to the cows with a look of intense concentration on his weathered face. Beside him, Mheshimiwa Kiprop, the local politician, was busy feeding the chickens, his finely tailored suit contrasting sharply with the rural surroundings.


Across the yard, Wanjiku spotted Mwalimu Otieno, the schoolteacher, diligently sweeping the front porch while reciting multiplication tables to himself. And last but not least, there was Mchungaji Musa, the village pastor, deep in prayer as he watered the garden with holy water from the church.


As Wanjiku made her way to the kitchen to prepare breakfast, she couldn't help but marvel at the unique arrangement of her household. In Kwaheri, it was perfectly normal for women to have multiple husbands, a tradition that had been passed down for generations. And while some might find it unconventional, Wanjiku wouldn't have it any other way.


After all, having four husbands meant four times the love, four times the support, and, of course, four times the chores. But Wanjiku didn't mind. She relished in the chaos of her bustling household, finding joy in the little moments shared with each of her husbands.


As she flipped pancakes and brewed tea, Wanjiku couldn't help but smile at the thought of the day ahead. With her four husbands by her side, there was no challenge too great, no obstacle too daunting. Together, they were a force to be reckoned with—a modern-day family defying societal norms and forging their own path in the world.


And as the sun rose higher in the sky, casting a warm glow over the village of Kwaheri, Wanjiku knew that she was exactly where she belonged—surrounded by love, laughter, and the comforting cluck of chickens in the yard.



 

Authors note:

Hi, my name shall remain a mystery till the end of time, and it's a pleasure to have you read my stuffs. I’m an artist investigating the potential of generative AI to improve writing and readability and in all my works I use a combination of my writing + ChatGPT #fortheplot.


The writing in Black is everything AI generated and the bits in orange are my edits.


This piece is inspired by an excerpt from Elsie Mungai's short story "Replacing P with M" which is infinitely better than what Chat GPT spewed.


You can learn more on her Instagram @_nyachihiiiii_ or email nyachimungai@gmail.com and check out their blog mymusingelsiemungai.blogspot.com


 

Here's the prompt I used: Create a short story based off this paragraph in the book "replacing P with M by Elsie Mungai"


"It's a typical day in the village, Wanjiku is woken up by the sound of cows lowing, chicken clucking and her four husbands performing various morning abulations."


Explore the concept of an alternate universe where it is more common for females to get second/third/fourth husbands than it is for males. Use a lot of humour in the story and make it appeal to an audience of young adults


Here are alternative AI-generated images:


(Tool: Pixlr.com | Prompt: a wife with four husbands)


(Tool: Pixlr.com | Prompt: a wife with four husbands on an African farm)


Software analysis:


Pros

Cons

The results were more racially inclusive than any other platform I've used thus far and it automatically included other races in the results without me having to ask for it specifically

The free trial of only 16 images

Easy to navigate with a user-friendly interface

The AI generative fill feature has some bugs ie, not understanding which area to modify and still having some leftover pixels of the previous feature

The load tie for the images generated wasn't relatively short

It doesn't save the images you generate, so if you reload the site or navigate to a different page, you lose what you generated and since you have limited credits it can feel like an L


48 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page